Courses

2016-17 SALC COURSES AT A GLANCE

Please click on the link above for a PDF timetable of courses offered by the SALC department in academic year 2016-17. Thank you.

COURSE SEARCH

 

SALC UNDERGRADUATE COURSES

See also our undergraduate program.

Courses marked with an asterisk* are not regularly offered.

INTRO COURSES

Introduction to South Asian Civilizations I-II

SALC 20100-20200 (=ANTH 24101-24102, HIST 10800-10900, SOSC 23000-23100) This sequence introduces core themes in the formation of culture and society in South Asia from the early modern period until the present. This sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies. These courses must be taken in sequence. The first quarter focuses on Islam in South Asia, Hindu-Muslim interaction, Mughal political and literary traditions, and South Asia’s early encounters with Europe. The second quarter analyzes the colonial period (i.e., reform movements, the rise of nationalism, communalism, caste, and other identity movements) up to the independence and partition of India. Muzaffar Alam, Winter 2017; Dipesh Chakrabarty, Spring 2017.

Intro to Buddhism

SALC 29700 (=SALC 39700, HREL 39700, RLST 26150, CHDV 39701, CHDV 29701) This course, which is intended for both undergraduates and graduates, introduces students to some aspects of the philosophy, psychology, and meditation practice of the Theravada Buddhist tradition in premodern and modern South and Southeast Asia, and also in the modern west. It looks first at basic Buddhist ideas and practices, , and then and the relationship(s) between Buddhism and psychology, in two ways: in relation to the indigenous psychology of the Shan in contemporary Northern Thailand, and then in the ways elements from Buddhist meditation have been taken up in recent years by western scientific psychologists. The course ends with an ethnography of a Buddhist meditation monastery in Thailand. Throughout the course attention is paid to the role(s) of gender. Steven Collins, Spring 2017.

Deccan Days:  Exploring South Indian Frontiers

SALC 29503/1 . This SALC seminar, open to both undergraduates and graduate students, attempts a cultural-historical overview of the great Deccan plateau and its major languages, cultures, literary and artistic monuments, and driving historical forces and themes. It follows a broad chronological order but also seeks to juxtapose thematic and generic topics from distinct historical periods. Each class presents at least one major text in translation, keyed to the period and the topics examined. Given the wide scope of Deccani history, the seminar seeks to make good use of expertise in many fields by SALC faculty and can be classed as a Faculty Seminar. David Shulman, Spring 2017.

The Mahabharata in English Translation

SALC 20400 (=FNDL 24400, HREL 35000,SALC 48200,RLST 26800) A reading of the Mahabharata in English translation (van Buitenen, Narasimhan, Ganguli, and Doniger [ms.]), with special attention to issues of mythology, feminism, and theodicy. (C) W. Doniger, Winter 2017.

Intro to Premodern South Asian Lit: Courts, Poets, Power

SALC 22603. The Indian subcontinent and the surrounding areas were home to some of the most vibrant literary traditions in world history. The aim of this course is to introduce students to the main trends in the premodern (pre-nineteenth century) literatures of South Asia through a selection of texts translated from a variety of languages (Bengali, Hindi, Marathi, Persian, Sanskrit, Tamil, Telugu, Urdu, etc.). We will discuss issues of literary historiography, the relations between orality and writing, the basic principles of Dravidian, Sanskrit, and Perso-Arabic poetics, the formation of vernacular literary traditions, multilingual literacy, and the role of literature in social interactions and community building in premodern South Asia. Each reading will thus be framed by the systematic exploration of those poetic systems and a close reading of representative texts. Attention will also be given to the original languages in which those texts were composed. The course offers a comprehensive and critical introduction to major non-western knowledge systems and aesthetic theories. Thibaut d’Hubert, Autumn 2017.

How to do things with South Asian texts? Literary Theories and South Asian Literatures

SALC 23700/SALC 33700. This course provides an overview of different methods, approaches and themes currently prevalent in the study of South Asian texts from various periods. Topics covered will include translation (theory and practice), book history, literary history, textual criticism, genre theory (the novel in South Asia), literature and colonialism, cultural mobility studies (Greenblatt) and comparative literature/new philologies (Spivak, Ette). Readings will include work by George Steiner, Sheldon Pollock, Meenakshi Mukherjee, Terry Eagleton, Stephen Greenblatt, Gayatri Spivak, Ottmar Ette, and others. We will discuss these different approaches with particular reference to the texts with which participating students are working for their various projects. Students interested in both pre-modern and modern/contemporary texts are welcome. While the course is organized primarily from a literary studies perspective, it will also be of interest to students of history, anthropology and other disciplines dealing with "texts". The course is open to both undergraduates and graduate students (no prior knowledge of literary theory or South Asian writing is assumed.) Sascha Ebeling. Winter 2017.

South Asian Aesthetics: Rasa to Rap, Kamasutra to Kant

SALC 29300 (=SALC 49300).  This course introduces students to the rich traditions of aesthetic thought in South Asia, a region that includes (among others) the modern-day states of India, Pakistan, Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Nepal and Sri Lanka. By engaging with theories of art, literature and music from the Indic and Indo-Persian traditions, we will attempt to better understand what happens in an aesthetic experience. A central concern will be thinking about how much any aesthetic tradition, be it South Asian or other, is rooted in the particular epistemic and cultural values of the society that produced it; we will therefore explore how ideas from the South Asian tradition can help us to understand not only South Asian material, but art in other societies as well, and to re-think the boundaries of 'aesthetic' thought.  Class discussion, small group work, and individual presentations will be regular features of the class. Two sessions will include performances by, and discussions with, performing artists (dancers and musicians). We will also make one visit to the Art Institute Chicago.  Tyler Williams, Spring 2018.

Colonizations III

SALC 20702 (=CRES 24003, ANTH 24003, HIST 18303, SOSC 24003) The third quarter considers the processes and consequences of decolonization both in the newly independent nations and the former colonial powers. This sequence (ANTH 24001-24002-24003) meets the general education requirement in civilization studies. These courses can be taken in any sequence. (Contact CRES for further information about the sequence and the instructors).

Wives, Widows, Prostitutes: North Indian Literature and the “Women’s Question”

SALC 27904/43800 (=GNSE 27902/47900) From the early 19th century onward, the debate on the status of Indian women was an integral part of the discourse on the state of civilization, Hindu tradition, and social reform in colonial India. This course will explore how Indian authors of the late 19th and early 20th centuries engaged with the so-called “women’s question.” Caught between middle-class conservatism and the urge for social reform, Hindi and Urdu writers addressed controversial issues such as female education, child marriage, widow remarriage, and prostitution in their fictional and discursive writings. We will explore the tensions of a literary and social agenda that advocated the ‘uplift’ of women as a necessary precondition for the progress of the nation, while also expressing patriarchal fears about women’s rights and freedom. The course is open to both undergraduate and graduate students. Basic knowledge of Hindi and/or Urdu is preferable, but not required. We will read works by Nazir Ahmad, Premcand, Jainendra Kumar, Mirza Hadi Ruswa, and Mahadevi Varma in English translation, and also look at texts used in Indian female education at the time. Ulrike Stark, Spring 2018.

Frontiers and Borders in South Asia*

SALC 26804 (=GEOG 26400, GLST 26804, HIST 26804) Sometimes the frontline of empires and nation-states, sometimes neglected or inaccessible, peripheral spaces are often of core concern to the central state. The aim of this upper-level undergraduate seminar is to examine the history of borders, borderlands, and frontiers as political and social concepts and as produced spaces. We will examine an array of case studies in addition to more theoretical scholarship that spans the disciplines of history, environmental studies, political science, anthropology, and geography. While using South Asia (itself a rather recently invented "area") as the primary geographic and historical focus this course will not be bound exclusively to it. The first goal of the course is to explore the evolution of key concepts such as space, territory, frontier, and borders/borderlands. The second goal is to develop methods for analyzing subjects that are simultaneously physical spaces and political, social, and historical ideas. Finally, it seeks to introduce students to areas that often fall beyond the penumbra of historical surveys centered on the nation-state. No prior knowledge of South Asian history is assumed. Weekly readings will average 150 pages. Note: No prior knowledge of South Asian history is assumed. Kyle Gardner, Winter 2017.

Sex and Censorship*

SALC 25306 (=HIST 26710, GNSE 25306, HREL 25306) Restrictions on speech are a feature of democracies everywhere, from persecuting whistle-blowers in the US, to ban on religious symbols in France, to blocking Twitter in Turkey. What sets the South Asian experience apart? This introductory course will interrogate how a nexus of concerns about power, religion, and sex, originating in the colonial experience, has shaped the particular dynamics of censorship in South Asia. By looking at a long history of banning and prohibition, we will also examine how censorship has molded South Asian cultural and political lives. Ahona Panda, Autumn 2016.

ADVANCED UNDRGRADUATE COURSES

Buddhist Thought in India and Tibet

SALC 23903 (=RLST 23900) The purpose of this course is to introduce students to something of the range of Buddhist philosophical thought and doctrine that developed in first-millennium India—developments that were decisive for the philosophical curricula of still vibrant Tibetan traditions of Buddhism, which may also be considered. The aim will be not only to appreciate the history of these developments, but also (and especially) to engage them philosophically, taking them seriously in the same way that (e.g.) Aristotle and Kant are still taken seriously in philosophy departments. Dan Arnold, Spring.

Ethical and Theological Issues in Hinduism

SALC 38304 (=HREL 33702; RLST 23904; SCTH 32202) A seminar suitable for BA, MA and Ph D students.Permission of the instructor. An exploration of Hindu attitudes to, and mythologies of, women, animals, people of low caste, members of various religious groups, homosexuals, foreigners, criminals, and in general violators of the codes of dharma. The course is designed around the new Norton Anthology of Hinduism, supplemented by a history of the Hindus. The readings will focus closely on a few texts, some Sanskrit and some from vernacular literatures, from several different historical periods.It will situate each major idea in the context of the historical events to which it responded: the Rig Veda in the Indo-European migrations, the Upanishads in the social crisis of the first great cities on the Ganges, and so forth, up to the present day BJP revisionist tactics. And it will emphasize the alternative traditions of women and the lower classes. Reading list:Wendy Doniger, The Norton Anthology of Hinduism, Wendy Doniger: The Hindus: An Alternative History. Penguin, 2009.10-15 page paper at the end of the course. Wendy Doniger, Spring 2017.

Indian Philosophy I

SALC 20901 (=DVPR 30201/HREL 30200/ 30901/RLST 24201) The early development of philosophical thought in India will be traced through readings in the Upanishads, early Buddhist works, and the primary texts of the Samkhya and Yoga traditions, together with readings from contemporary philosophical interpreters of these sources. The emergence of systems of logic and the philosophy of language will be among topics surveyed. Although there is no formal prerequisite for the course, some background in Western philosophy is desirable. T/TH 10:30-11:50 S201. Matthew Kapstein, Winter 2017.

Indian Philosophy II: The Classical Traditions

SALC 20902 (=HREL 30300, SALC 30902, DVPR 30302, RLST 24202) Prerequisite(s): Students are encouraged (but not required) to take Indian Philosophy I before taking this course. Following on the Indian Philosophy I course offered winter term, this course will survey major developments in the mature period of scholastic philosophy in India — a period, beginning a little before the middle of the first millennium C.E., that is characterized by extensive and sophisticated debate (made possible by the emergence of a largely shared vocabulary of key philosophical concepts) among philosophers from a great variety of schools of thought. Dan Arnold, Spring, 2017.

Text and World in Medieval India

SALC 28403 (=SALC 38403, SALC 48403). This course is intended as a graduate seminar (undergraduates are welcome to attend, too) concentrating on the cultural and intellectual history of medieval southern Asia.  For the purposes of the course, ‘medieval’ is roughly delimited by the half-millennium 700-1200 CE; ‘southern Asia’ refers mostly to the Indian subcontinent, with collateral attention paid to mainland and insular Southeast Asia. The recurrent focus will be on the reciprocal connections between texts—as physical artifacts, concretizations of cultural knowledge, articulations of traditions of wisdom, and realizations of intentional projects—and the social and physical world of their emergence and circulation.  The class meetings will be divided between thematic and regional topics.  Themes include the royal court, the nature of religious plurality, literary intertextuality, and the nature and efficacy of linguistic reference; regional concentrations include the Tamil country, Pāla-Sena Bengal, Angkor, central Java, and Kashmir. Whitney Cox. Winter 2017.

Mughal India: Tradition and Transition

SALC 27701 (=SALC 37701, HIST 26602, HIST 36602) The focus of this course is on the period of Mughal rule during the late sixteenth, seventeenth, and eighteenth centuries, especially on selected issues that have been at the center of historiographical debate in the past decades. Muzaffar Alam, Autumn 2016.

Persian Philology and Poetry in South Asia

SALC 48602 (=NECL 48602, PERS 48602) Prerequisites: intermediate level of Persian. This course offers an introduction to Persian philology as it developed in South Asia during the late Mughal period. Our aim is to observe how Persian was studied as a literary idiom and how poems were read taking grammar as a point of entry. The first sessions will provide an introduction to some fundamental methods and basic terminology of Indo-Persian philology. We will read the short prefaces of two traditional grammars: Anṣārī Jaunpūrī (d. 1225/1810, Murshidabad)’s Qawāʿid-i fārsī and ʿAbd al-Wāsiʿ Hānsawī (fl. 2nd half 17th)’s Risala-yi ʿAbd al-Wāsiʿ. Then, we will look at a selection of examples to see how this grammatical knowledge was used to analyze the language of classical mathnawīs by closely reading the comments made on some verses taken from Jāmī’s Yūsuf o Zulaykhā. After these introductory classes, will focus on Akbar (r. 1556-1605)’s poet laureate (malik al-shuʿarā) Faiḍī’s Nal Daman. Nal Daman is a mathnawī that is part of an unfinished project of khamsa. The poem is the adaptation of a very popular story found in the Sanskrit Mahābhārata and in several South Asian vernacular versions. In class we will use a 19th-c. lithographed edition of Nal Daman that contains a marginal commentary (ḥāshiya). We will also discuss topics related to the model, the context of the composition and afterlife of Nal Daman, the genre of the mathnawī-i ʿāshiqāna in the multilingual context of South Asia, and the style of Faiḍī’s poetry. Instructors' consent required. Thibaut d'Hubert and Muzaffar Alam, Spring 2017.

Inequality: Gender, Violence, Citizenship

SALC 20509 (GNSE 11006, HIST 17203) This course analyzes inequality and the overt and covert violence that results from it.  The inequalities under consideration are often grounded in gender and sex but also, and more importantly, ones that result from a complex intersection of gender, sex, and other identities. Inequality is what produces the experience of differential citizenship, a topic that exercises scholars the world over.  In particular, those interested in issues of feminism, community, and ethnicity have studied why women (and then some women more than others) or particular social groups such as gay or trans groups, experience disenfranchisement more than their counterparts.  This is so even when, officially, many cultures/ nation states grant their members/citizens formal equality before the law. While many of the specific examples around which this course is framed emerge out of South Asia, our analyses will be structured through an engagement with critical theoretical texts that address issues of gendered oppression and discrimination in other parts of the world.  Readings will include historical, anthropological, literary texts. Key themes of the course include: debates on parité in France and differential citizenship for religious minorities in India; caste based violence in India studied comparatively with debates on violence against aboriginal in Australia and Canada; rape and human rights; the politics of homosexuality; violence around popular and high culture; the panic around "family values" as recently evidenced in the surrogacy debates in India. Rochona Majumdar, Autumn 2017.

Indian Art Cinema

SALC 20510 (=SALC 30510, CMST 24108, CMST 34108) What do we mean when we refer to “art films” in the Indian context? Is it fair to refer to the body of film works that come under this rubric as Indian national cinema? Through a close analysis of films by Satyajit Ray, Ritwik Ghatak, Mrinal Sen, Shyam Benegal, Mani Kaul, Basu Chatterjee, M. S. Sathyu, Girish Kasaravalli, and Aparna Sen, this course will analyze the different currents in Indian art cinema. Rochona Majumdar.

SALC GRADUATE COURSES

Hindi Cinema: from Bombay to Bollywood
SALC 30509 (=SALC 20509,CMST 24107,CMST 34107, GNSE 20509, HIST 26709, HIST 36709). This course maps the transformation of the Hindi film industry in India. Starting out as a regional film production center, how did the Bombay film industry and Hindi cinema gain the reputation of being the leader of Indian cinema? This despite the fact that most critical acclaim, by the state and film critics, was reserved for “art cinema.” Through an analysis of Hindi films from the 1950s to the present we map the main trends of this complex artistic/industrial complex to arrive at an understanding of the deep connect between cinema and other social imaginaries. Rochona Majumdar, Winter 2016.
 
Indian Art Cinema
SALC 30510 (=SALC 20510,CMST 24108,CMST 34108) What do we mean when we refer to “art films” in the Indian context? Is it fair to refer to the body of film works that come under this rubric as Indian national cinema? Through a close analysis of films by Satyajit Ray, Ritwik Ghatak, Mrinal Sen, Shyam Benegal, Mani Kaul, Basu Chatterjee, M. S. Sathyu, Girish Kasaravalli, and Aparna Sen, this course will analyze the different currents in Indian art cinema. Rochona Majumdar, Spring 2016.
 
Survey of Persian Literature: Prose 900-1500 CE
SALC 30613 (=SALC 20613, PERS 30010, ISLM 30010, CMES 30010). PQ: 2 years of Persian or the equivalent. This course surveys the development of Persian prose literature from the tenth to fifteenth century, with a focus on prose genres, including scientific texts (e.g., Hodud al-`alam), mirrors for princes (e.g., Qabus-nama), political theory (e.g., Siyasat-nama), sufi hagiography (e.g., Attar's Tazkerat al-owliya), mystical treatises (e.g., Kashf al-Mahjub, Kimiya-ye sa`adat, Savaneh), philosophical allegories (e.g., `Aql-e sorx), historical texts (such as Tarix-e jahangosha), and belles lettres (e.g, maqamat of Hamidi, and prose romances), and religious texts (such as Rowzat al-shohada). We will become acquainted with a variety of authors, consider the ways that Persian language itself is changing, and how genres evolve.  Throughout, we will consider how intellectual history is revealed through Persian prose texts and question the traditional categories of chronological or stylistic periodization, and evaluate how (or whether?) one might best write a literary history of Persian, or a vernacular intellectual history of Islam, from the perspective of the Persian prose tradition.  This course is suitable as a third-year Persian course for students who have completed the intermediate Persian sequence.  Franklin Lewis, Autumn.
 
Music of South Asia
SALC 30800 (=SALC 20800, MUSI 23700). PQ: Any 10000-level music course or consent of instructor. This course examines the music of South Asia as an aesthetic domain with both unity and particularity in the region. The unity of the North and South Indian classical traditions is treated historically and analytically, with special emphasis placed on correlating their musical and mythological aspects. The classical traditions are contrasted with regional, tribal, and folk music with respect to fundamental conceptualizations of music and the roles it plays in society. In addition, the repertories of Pakistan, Afghanistan, and Sri Lanka, as well as states and nations bordering the region, are covered. Music is also considered as a component of myth, religion, popular culture, and the confrontation with modernity. Kaley Mason, Autumn.
 
How to do things with South Asian texts? Literary Theories and South Asian Literatures
SALC 33700 (=SALC 23700). This course provides an overview of different methods, approaches and themes currently prevalent in the study of South Asian texts from various periods.  Topics covered will include translation (theory and practice), book history, literary history, textual criticism, genre theory (the novel in South Asia), literature and colonialism, cultural mobility studies (Greenblatt) and comparative literature/new philologies (Spivak, Ette).  Readings will include work by George Steiner, Sheldon Pollock, Meenakshi Mukherjee, Terry Eagleton, Stephen Greenblatt, Gayatri Spivak, Ottmar Ette, and others.  We will discuss these different approaches with particular reference to the texts with which participating students are working for their various projects.  Students interested in both pre-modern and modern/contemporary texts are welcome.  While the course is organized primarily from a literary studies perspective, it will also be of interest to students of history, anthropology and other disciplines dealing with "texts".  The course is open to both undergraduate and graduate students (no prior knowledge of literary theory or South Asian writing is assumed).  Sascha Ebeling.  Winter 2017.
 
Mughal India: Tradition and Transition
SALC 37701 (=SALC 27701, HIST 26602, HIST 36602) The focus of this course is on the period of Mughal rule during the late sixteenth, seventeenth, and eighteenth centuries, especially on selected issues that have been at the center of historiographical debate in the past decades.  Muzaffar Alam, Autumn.
 
Intro to Buddhism.
SALC 39700 (=SALC 29700, HREL 39700, RLST 26150, CHDV 39701, CHDV 29701).   This course, which is intended for both undergraduates and graduates, introduces students to some aspects of the philosophy, psychology, and meditation practice of the Theravada Buddhist tradition in premodern and modern South and Southeast Asia, and also in the modern west. It looks first at basic Buddhist ideas and practices, , and then and the relationship(s) between Buddhism and psychology, in two ways: in relation to the indigenous psychology of the Shan in contemporary Northern Thailand, and then in the ways elements from Buddhist meditation have been taken up in recent years by western scientific psychologists. The course ends with an ethnography of a Buddhist meditation monastery in Thailand. Throughout the course attention is paid to the role(s) of gender. Steven Collins. Spring 2017.
 
Research Themes I
SALC 40100 (=HIST 61802)  This course will focus on the intellectual traffic over the last several decades between postcolonial theory/criticism and the field of South Asian history. Scholarship bearing on questions of modernity, transition to capitalism, critiques of nationalism and the nation, caste and inequality, globalization, and other related issues will be discussed in class.SALC 40100.  Dipesh Chakrabarty. Spring 2017.
 
Research Themes II
Topic: Representing Renunciation
SALC 40200.  This course will look at texts and documentary films about both male and female renunciation (monasticism) in South and Southeast Asia (Hinduism, Jainism, Buddhism).  It will also read and discuss Bill Nichols’ book Introduction to Documentary Film.  It will be concerned with how these institutions and traditions are represented in the two media.  How far are the media similar or different?  Steven Collins, Winter 2016.
 
Many Ramayanas
SALC 42501 (=HREL 42501, SCTH 40701, FNDL 22911, RLST 26801). A close reading of the great Hindu Epic, the story of Rama’s recovery of his wife, Sita, from the demon Ravana on the island of Lanka, with special attention to changes in the telling of the story throughout Indian history, up to its present use as a political weapon against Muslims and a rallying point for Hindu fundamentalists.  Readings in Paula Richman, Many Ramayanas and Questioning Ramayanas; in translations of the Ramayanas of Valmiki, Kampan, Tulsi, and Michael Dutta, as well as the Ramjataka; Rama the Steadfast, trans. Brockington; the Yogavasistha-Maharamayana; and contemporary comic books and films.  Wendy Doniger, Winter.
 
Wives, Widows, Prostitutes: Indian Lit & the Women's Question
SALC 43800 (=SALC 27904, HIND 47904, GNSE 27902/47900).  PQ: Basic knowledge of Hindi and/or Urdu is preferable but not required. From the early nineteenth century onward, the debate on the condition and status of Indian women was an integral part of the discourse on the state of civilization, Hindu tradition, and social reform in colonial India. This course explores how Indian authors of the late 19th and early 20th centuries engaged with the so-called "women's question." Caught between middle-class conservatism and the urge for social reform, Hindi and Urdu writers addressed controversial issues such as female education, child marriage, widow remarriage, and prostitution in their fictional and other writings. We will explore the tensions of a literary and social agenda that advocated the "uplift" of women as a necessary precondition for the progress of the nation, while also expressing patriarchal fears about women's rights and freedom. Texts will be read in English translation.  Ulrike Stark, Spring 2016.
 
Women's Rights, Cultural Nationalism, and Moral Panics: Africa and India
SALC 43105 (=CDIN, ANTH, CHDV, HIST).  Contemporary history is rife with a tension between the rise of a rights discourse and accompanying moral panics. This dialectic constitutes the central theme of this course.  Why is it that women’s economic success, political recognition, and rights to their bodies have been accompanied by “moral panics” over the visibility, mobility, and sexuality of women and girls?  And what might this tell us about changing forms of differential citizenship in the contemporary world?  In order to take up these questions, this course offers a historical and anthropological perspective on the questions of gender and freedom/ moral panic/ differential citizenship.  We focus our inquiry on empirical examples drawn from Africa and India.  Rochona Majumdar.  Winter 2017.
 
Islam in Modern South Asia
SALC 47301 (=SALC 37301, HIST 45903, NEHC 37301).  PQ: Open to graduate students and advanced undergrads only.  In the nineteenth and twentieth centuries Islam in South Asia came to embrace roughly one third of the Muslims of the world.  It also moved from being primarily a receiver of Islamic influences from outside the subcontinent to increasingly being a transmitter of influences to the wider Muslim world. The beginning of the period saw great changes for Muslims as, after 600 years of wielding power, they became subject to British rule.  In this context there was a ferment of new ideas as Muslims confronted the challenges of maintaining a Muslim society without power and in the face of the apparent triumph of Western civilisation.  Out of the ferment came ideas and institutions which were to have great influence in South Asia, but also far beyond: the Islamic modernism of Saiyid Ahmad Khan, his Aligarh movei Ahl-i Hadith and the Tablighi Jama<at; and the political Islam pioneered by Mawlana Mawdudi and his Jama<ati Islami.  On the political side there was the development of Muslim separatism, eventually led by the remarkable Jinnah, and culminating in the partition of British India at independence.  A growing issue from the 1920s was what should be the relationship between Islam and the modern state.  Arguably, Pakistan was to be the laboratory in which the problem was worked out.  But it was no less a problem for Muslims in India and Bangladesh, and in all these states finding a solution has been subject to the play of politics, national and international. While covering the ground above the course will also be concerned to address these themes amongst others: the relationship between Islam and the Indic world in which it moved; and issues of authority, identity, emerging individualism, Pan-Islamic loyalties and modernities.
           The course will consist of eight three-hour classes, each focussed on two topics with an introduction and student presentations, followed by a question-and-answer session. In the final hour and a quarter of each three-hour session, Professor Robinson will give a lecture on major themes in Islam in South Asia since 1800, linking them were appropriate to developments elsewhere in the Islamic world.  Francis Robinson, Winter 2016.
 
Transmission of Islamic Knowledge in South Asia since 1800
SALC 47302 (SALC 37302, HIST 45904, NEHC 37302).  PQ: Open to graduate students and advanced undergrads only.  One of the most striking developments in the Muslim world over the past two centuries is that, in spite of most of it being subject to colonial rule, or to rulers who wished to reshape Muslim societies after the model of the West, Islamic knowledge has come to be more vigorously and more widely disseminated than ever before. There has been an Islamisation of Muslim societies from below. This course will examine this most important process in the context of South Asia. We will examine the role of ulama, the madrasas in which they teach, the nature of the Dars-i Nizami madrasa curriculum, and the reasons for the spread of these institutions from c. 100 formal madrasas in 1900 to c. 100,000 today. Women’s madrasas will not be neglected. We will examine Sufis and Sufi shrines, and their relationships to their constituencies; we will explore the role of spiritual devotion in the life of the individual. Print was only taken up in South Asia in the nineteenth century so we will need to investigate the impact of the printed word. Sermons had a role to play, but particularly two types of sermons, the milad sermon on aspects of the life of the Prophet and Shi<a sermons mourning the fate of the Imams. Groups with a particularly proselytizing purpose will be studied, for instance, the Tablighi Jama<at. But also women’s proselytizing groups such as al-Huda and the women’s reading groups which have flourished under the Jama<ati Islami and its affiliates. Amongst the themes which will be addressed are: the significance of the move from orality to literacy, the impact of print, the emergence of self-interpretation and the impact of the electronic world.
          Each class will be focused on two topics with an introduction and student presentations followed by a question-and-answer session. In the final hour and a quarter of each three-hour session, Professor Robinson will give a lecture on a major theme in the transmission of Islamic knowledge and where appropriate link it to developments elsewhere in the Islamic world.  Francis Robinson, Spring 2016.
 
Text and World in Medieval India
SALC 48403 (=SALC 28403, SALC 38403). This course is intended as a graduate seminar (undergraduates are welcome to attend, too) concentrating on the cultural and intellectual history of medieval southern Asia.  For the purposes of the course, ‘medieval’ is roughly delimited by the half-millennium 700-1200 CE; ‘southern Asia’ refers mostly to the Indian subcontinent, with collateral attention paid to mainland and insular Southeast Asia. The recurrent focus will be on the reciprocal connections between texts—as physical artifacts, concretizations of cultural knowledge, articulations of traditions of wisdom, and realizations of intentional projects—and the social and physical world of their emergence and circulation.  The class meetings will be divided between thematic and regional topics.  Themes include the royal court, the nature of religious plurality, literary intertextuality, and the nature and efficacy of linguistic reference; regional concentrations include the Tamil country, Pāla-Sena Bengal, Angkor, central Java, and Kashmir. Whitney Cox. Winter 2017.
 
Readings in Tibetan Buddhist Texts
SALC 48501 (=HREL 48910, DVPR 48910).  PQ: Open to students reading Tibetan at the advanced level.  Readings in selected Buddhist doctrinal writings in Tibetan.  Matthew Kapstein, Winter.
 

Persian Philology and Poetry in South Asia

SALC 48602 (=NECL 48602, PERS 48602) Prerequisites: intermediate level of Persian. This course offers an introduction to Persian philology as it developed in South Asia during the late Mughal period. Our aim is to observe how Persian was studied as a literary idiom and how poems were read taking grammar as a point of entry. The first sessions will provide an introduction to some fundamental methods and basic terminology of Indo-Persian philology. We will read the short prefaces of two traditional grammars: Anṣārī Jaunpūrī (d. 1225/1810, Murshidabad)’s Qawāʿid-i fārsī and ʿAbd al-Wāsiʿ Hānsawī (fl. 2nd half 17th)’s Risala-yi ʿAbd al-Wāsiʿ. Then, we will look at a selection of examples to see how this grammatical knowledge was used to analyze the language of classical mathnawīs by closely reading the comments made on some verses taken from Jāmī’s Yūsuf o Zulaykhā. After these introductory classes, will focus on Akbar (r. 1556-1605)’s poet laureate (malik al-shuʿarā) Faiḍī’s Nal Daman. Nal Daman is a mathnawī that is part of an unfinished project of khamsa. The poem is the adaptation of a very popular story found in the Sanskrit Mahābhārata and in several South Asian vernacular versions. In class we will use a 19th-c. lithographed edition of Nal Daman that contains a marginal commentary (ḥāshiya). We will also discuss topics related to the model, the context of the composition and afterlife of Nal Daman, the genre of the mathnawī-i ʿāshiqāna in the multilingual context of South Asia, and the style of Faiḍī’s poetry. Instructors' consent required. Thibaut d'Hubert and Muzaffar Alam, Spring 2017.

 
South Asian Aesthetics: Rasa to Rap, Kamasutra to Kant
SALC 49300 (=SALC 29300).  This course introduces students to the rich traditions of aesthetic thought in South Asia, a region that includes (among others) the modern-day states of India, Pakistan, Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Nepal and Sri Lanka. By engaging with theories of art, literature and music from the Indic and Indo-Persian traditions, we will attempt to better understand what happens in an aesthetic experience. A central concern will be thinking about how much any aesthetic tradition, be it South Asian or other, is rooted in the particular epistemic and cultural values of the society that produced it; we will therefore explore how ideas from the South Asian tradition can help us to understand not only South Asian material, but art in other societies as well, and to re-think the boundaries of 'aesthetic' thought.  Class discussion, small group work, and individual presentations will be regular features of the class. Two sessions will include performances by, and discussions with, performing artists (dancers and musicians). We will also make one visit to the Art Institute Chicago.  Tyler Williams, Spring.
 
Indian Tantrisms
SALC 50802 (=HREL 50810).  PQ: Background in the study of Indian religions. Description not yet available.  Christian Wedemeyer, Winter.
 
Recent Work on Self and Non-Self in Indian Philosophy
SALC 51000 (=HREL 53102, DVPR 53102).  PQ:  Indian Philosophy I and II or equivalent; or familiarity with recent treatments of Personal Identity in Anglo-American philosophy. Recent years have seen a considerable body of new scholarship devoted to the problem of personal identity and related topics in Indian and Buddhist philosophy, much of this work now informed by sustained engagement with the treatment of analogous problems in contemporary Anglo-American philosophy (Parfit et al).  The present seminar will take up a selection of recent contributions—by Ganeri, Siderits, and Sorabji, among others-considered in relation both to the Indian sources they interpret and the contemporary discussions that shape their interpretations.  Matthew Kapstein, Winter.
 

Language courses

BANGLA (BENGALI) COURSES

First Year Bangla I-II-III
BANG 10100-10200-10300.  This sequence concentrates on developing skills in speaking, listening, reading and writing Bangla at the novice and intermediate low levels. It is designed both for scholars who want to do research on Bengal and for those who want to gain proficiency in elementary Bangla for communication purposes. Evaluation will be based on classroom performance, attendance, homework assignments, projects, quizzes and final examination.  Mandira Bhaduri, Autumn-Winter-Spring.
 
Second Year Bangla I-II-III
BANG 20100-20200-20300.  PQ: First year Bangla or comparable level of language skills.  This sequence is a continuation of First-Year Bangla and aims at gaining intermediate high proficiency in the language. Students who have prior knowledge of elementary Bengali can join the course. The course concentrates equally on speaking, listening, reading and writing skills. At the end of the course the learner is supposed to have a command of Bengali language and culture that allows him/her to communicate with native speakers with ease. He/she will have sufficient reading abilities to comprehend non-technical modern texts. Evaluation will be based on classroom performance, homework assignments, projects, tests, and final examination.  Mandira Bhaduri, Autumn-Winter-Spring.
 
Third Year Bangla I-II-III
BANG 30100-30200-30300.  PQ: Second year Bangla or comparable level of language skills.  When joining this course the student is expected to demonstrate the ability to narrate in all time frames of the language. The student should be able to provide a simple though articulate discourse on familiar topics and subjects directly related to the his/her interests. He/She will learn to provide a full account of events and to use appropriately complex sentences in Bangla. We will also focus on some aspects of the technical language pertaining to various domains. The student will be invited to discuss orally on written material studied in class and at home, and he/she will have to produce two to three pages long essays on a given topic. Systematic introductions to a variety of registers and literary idioms (19th century Sadhu Bhasha, dialects, etc.) will also be provided. By the end of the spring quarter the student will have the necessary tools to expand significantly his/her abilities in order to reach the superior level.  Thibaut d’Hubert, Autumn-Winter-Spring.
 
Fourth Year Bangla I-II-III
BANG 40100-40200-40300.  PQ: Third year Bangla or comparable level of language skills.  Students attending this course must be able to produce an articulate discourse on subjects related to history and literary criticism. They should also have a good command of Bengali grammar. The course is mainly devoted to the study of selected modern and premodern Bangla texts (narrative literature, devotional and courtly poetry, treatises) in their historical contexts. We propose various readings in the historiography of Bangla literature, philology, traditional performance of Bangla poetry, etc... Besides, material from all periods will be studied according to the student's scholarly interests.  Thibaut d’Hubert, Autumn-Winter-Spring.
 
Readings: Advanced Bangla I-II-III
BANG 47900-47901-47902.  PQ: Fourth year Bangla or comparable level of language skills.  This course is for students who have successfully completed third and fourth year Bangla. It is divided between classes dealing with the current research themes of the instructor, and the study of material directly related with the research interests of the students. The focus is on methodology and the use of Bangla as a research language.  Thibaut d’Hubert, Autumn-Winter-Spring.

HINDI COURSES

First Year Hindi I-II-III
HIND 10100-10200-10300.  This five-day-a-week sequence presents an introduction to the world’s second most spoken language through reading, writing, listening, memorizing, and speaking. We begin with the Devanagari script, and we then introduce the Urdu script in Winter Quarter.  Jason Grunebaum, Autumn-Winter-Spring.
 
Second Year Hindi I-II-III
HIND 20100-20200-20300.  PQ: First year Hindi or comparable level of language skills.  This intermediate Hindi sequence presupposes knowledge of the basic grammar of Hindi and requires substantial reading and translating of Hindi prose, alongside exposure to advanced Hindi grammar topics. Regular attention is given to conversation and composition. Texts in Hindi.  Staff, Autumn; Jason Grunebaum, Winter-Spring.
 
Third Year Hindi I-II-III
HIND 30100-30200-30300.  PQ: Second year Hindi or comparable level of language skills.  Readings from Hindi literary and journalistic texts and a wide array of other sources depending on student interests, with continuing grammar review and practice in listening comprehension, composition and speech. Ulrike Stark, Autumn; Tyler Williams, Winter-Spring.
 
Fourth Year Hindi I-II-III
HIND 40100-40200-40300.  PQ: Third year Hindi or comparable level of language skills.  Readings from Hindi literary and journalistic texts and a wide array of other sources depending on student interests, with continuing grammar review and practice in listening comprehension, composition and speech.  Ulrike Stark, Autumn; Tyler Williams, Winter-Spring.
 
Readings: Advanced Hindi I-II-III
HIND 47900-47901-47902.  PQ: Fourth year Hindi or comparable level of language skills.  Readings from Hindi literary and journalistic texts and a wide array of other sources depending on student interests, with continuing grammar review and practice in listening comprehension, composition and speech. Ulrike Stark, Autumn; Tyler Williams, Winter-Spring.

MARATHI COURSES

First Year Marathi I-II-III
MARA 10100-10200-10300.  This sequence follows the textbook Marathi in Context (with its online supplement Marathi Online) in its focus on developing the basic skills—comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing—of Marathi language use. It covers all the fundamentals of Marathi grammar, but only as they are encountered in context, within a wide array of social and conversational “situations.”  Philip Engblom, Autumn-Winter-Spring.
 
Second Year Marathi I-II-III
MARA 20100-20200-20300.  PQ: First year Marathi or comparable level of language skills.  This sequence significantly extends both the breadth and the depth of the social and conversational situations introduced in the first year and includes numerous readings, largely from An Intermediate Marathi Reader. It covers all the grammar required for reading most kinds of modern Marathi prose texts.  Philip Engblom, Autumn-Winter-Spring.

PALI COURSES

First Year Pali I-II-III
PALI 10100-10200-10300.  This sequence of courses will not be offered in 2016-2017.  This sequence introduces the language of the Theravada Buddhist tradition. Essentials of grammar are emphasized, with readings in simpler texts by the end of the first quarter. 
 
Second Year Pali I-II
PALI 20100-20101.  PQ: First year Pali or comparable level of language skills.  Students in this intermediate Pali sequence read Pali texts that are chosen in accordance with their interests. The texts read in the introductory course are usually taken from a single, early stratum of Pali literature. The intermediate course takes examples of Pali from different periods and in different styles. Texts in Pali.  Steven Collins.  Winter 2017-Spring 2017.

SANSKRIT COURSES

First Year Sanskrit I-II-III
SANS 10100-10200-10300.  The first half (about fifteen weeks) of this sequence is spent mastering the reading and writing of the Devanagari script and studying the grammar of the classical Sanskrit language. The remainder of the sequence is devoted to close analytical reading of simple Sanskrit texts, which are used to reinforce the grammatical study done in the first half of this course. The aim is to bring students to the point where they are comfortably able, with the help of a dictionary, to read simple, narrative Sanskrit. Texts in Sanskrit.  Gary Tubb, Autumn; Staff, Winter; Patrick Olivelle, Spring.
 
Second Year Sanskrit I-II-III
SANS 20100-20200-20300.  PQ: First year Sanskrit or comparable level of language skills.  This sequence begins with a rapid review of grammar learned in the introductory course, followed by readings from a variety of Sanskrit texts. The goals are to consolidate grammatical knowledge, expand vocabulary, and gain confidence in reading different styles of Sanskrit independently.  The winter quarter will be a reading of the Mahabharata.  Patrick Olivelle, Autumn; Wendy Doniger, Winter; Gary Tubb, Spring.
 
Third Year Sanskrit I-II-III
SANS 30100-30200-30300.  PQ: Second year Sanskrit or comparable level of language skills.  Reading selections introduce major Sanskrit genres, including verse and prose narrative, lyric poetry, drama, and the intellectual discourse of religion, philosophy, and the sciences. Analysis of the language and style employed in commentarial texts and practice in reading such texts is also emphasized.  Patrick Olivelle, Autumn; Dan Arnold, Winter; Gary Tubb, Spring.
 
Fourth Year Sanskrit I-II-III
SANS 40100-40200-40300.  PQ: Third year Sanskrit or comparable level of language skills.  The goal of this sequence is to provide students with strong reading expertise in a wide range of Sanskrit texts in literature (poems and plays, verse and prose) and the scientific and philosophical discourses (e.g., grammar, logic, poetic theory, Buddhist thought), and commentarial literature on both.  Patrick Olivelle, Autumn; Dan Arnold, Winter; Gary Tubb, Spring.
 
Readings: Advanced Sanskrit I-II-III
SANS 47900-47901-47902.  PQ: Fourth year Sanskrit or comparable level of language skills.  Readings drawn from texts at an advanced level of difficulty in any of the relevant genres of Sanskrit, including literature, philosophy, literary theory, and religion, for students who have already completed fourth-year Sanskrit.  Continuing attention is given to matters of grammar, style, scholastic techniques, and intellectual and cultural content.  Patrick Olivelle, Autumn; Dan Arnold, Winter; Gary Tubb, Spring.

TAMIL COURSES

First Year Tamil I-II-III
TAML 10100-10200-10300 (=LGLN 10115-10215-10315).  The grammar of modern Tamil, in its manifestation both in colloquial and formal styles, and a good amount of vocabulary needed for referring to the immediate environment and using in day today transactions will be acquired. The four language skills acquired will be at different levels of proficiency with listening and speaking at the top followed by reading of formal texts and ending with basic writing skills in the formal style. The gradual progression in listening will be from teacher–student to speaker-speaker; in speaking it will be from articulation of sounds and intonation to expressing personal needs and interests, performing practical tasks, narrating experience and expressing emotions; in reading it will be from alphabet and spelling in the two styles to sign boards, controlled texts, factual news stories, interpretive reports and jokes; in writing from conversion of colloquial style into conventional style to personal letters, paraphrasing and translation of sentences. The tools used are classroom conversations, conversational tapes, videos, graded print materials, select materials from the print media including tales, which are complemented by exercises and quizzes.  The basic pedagogical materials are accessible at https://tamilcourse.uchicago.edu/. E. Annamalai, Autumn-Winter-Spring.
 
Second Year Tamil I-II-III
TAML 20100-20200-20300 (=LGLN 20115-20215-20315).  PQ: First year Tamil or comparable level of language skills.  This sequence is structured in a similar fashion as in the first year to develop the higher order of the four language skills. All materials, aural and visual, will be uncontrolled and unedited. The student will be introduced to web sources and dictionaries for self-reference and to using Unicode for writing. The student also will be exposed to dialects to have a taste of them. At the end of the course, the student will be able to converse in Tamil about specific topics of interest, to understand programs in the visual media including lyrics, to ask questions in field work situations, to read and understand texts on current events in newspapers and magazines, to understand and appreciate modern fiction and poetry, to read and understand public communications such as pamphlets, invitations, announcements, advertisements, and public speeches, and to write short essays and reports. If there is interest, web pages will be added to printed pages for reading and email and chat groups will be added for practicing writing.  The basic pedagogical materials are accessible at https://tamilcourse.uchicago.edu/. E. Annamalai, Autumn-Winter-Spring.
 
Third Year Tamil I-II-III
TAML 30100-30200-30300.  PQ: Second year Tamil or comparable level of language skills.  On the basis of a variety of readings, such as short stories, poems, excerpts from novels or non-fiction, this course addresses those issues of modern written Tamil grammar which have not been covered during the previous two years. Readings are typically selected with a view to providing important cultural information, and they are supplemented by film clips and other media. Class content may be chosen or adapted based on particular student needs. Further work on listening and speaking proficiency is also part of the course. Based on prior consultation with instructor regarding placement, this course might be an appropriate starting point for speakers of Tamil with previous knowledge (e.g., heritage students).  Sascha Ebeling, Autumn-Winter-Spring.
 
Fourth Year Tamil I-II-III
TAML 40100-40200-40300.  PQ: Third year Tamil or comparable level of language skills.  This course typically includes an introduction to Classical Tamil grammar and literature, with sample readings reaching from the oldest known Tamil literature (Sangam poetry) via bhakti poems to the magnificent courtly compositions of the high and late medieval periods. Various other types of linguistic variation may also be studied, e.g. inscriptional Tamil or dialects/regional language registers. Depending on the students’ needs, an overview of Tamil literary history is also given. Native or heritage speakers of Tamil are required to have a solid knowledge of modern Tamil grammar.  Sascha Ebeling, Autumn-Winter-Spring.
 
Readings: Advanced Tamil I-II-III
TAML 47900-47901-47902.  PQ: Fourth year Tamil or comparable level of language skills.  This course is for students who have successfully completed third- and fourth-year Tamil. It is typically tailored to student needs in terms of the selection of texts to be addressed and discussed. Depending on their interest, students may choose to read Tamil texts from any time period, country or genre. Prior consent of instructor is required.  Sascha Ebeling, Autumn-Winter-Spring.

TELUGU COURSES

First Year Telugu I-II-III
TLGU 10100-10200-10300. This sequence of courses will not be offered 2016-17.  First-year Telugu is designed to deal with all of the necessary language skills (i.e., speaking, writing, reading, oral comprehension). The primary goal is to equip students with basic communicative competence in Telugu. By the end of the first quarter, students are expected to be able to carry out day-to-day conversational situations with ease. Through this gradual learning process, students should be capable of reading and comprehending simple authentic texts. The goal is to tune students to a native speaker’s proficiency.  Staff, Autumn-Winter-Spring.
 
Second Year Telugu I-II-III
TLGU 20100-20200-20300.  This sequence of courses will not be offered 2016-17.  PQ: First year Telugu or comparable level of language skills.  Second-year Telugu is designed to expand the language skills in the four areas of speaking, writing, reading, and oral comprehension. To enhance these skills, students are required to read various Telugu texts, according to their academic interests. In addition, discussion is given to proverbs, idiomatic phrases, and onomatopoeic words which students will incorporate into their writing. Students watch popular Telugu film clips and listen to audio plays to gain overall understanding of vernacular cultural attitudes, and they are expected to give weekly oral presentations during the discussion session.  Staff, Autumn-Winter-Spring.

TIBETAN COURSES

First Year Tibetan I-II-III
TBTN 10100-10200-10300.  The Tibetan language, with a history going back more than one thousand years, is one of Asia’s major literary languages. At the present time, it is the first language of close to seven million people in Tibet, as well as in India, Nepal, and Bhutan. The textbook is The Manual of Standard Tibetan by Nicolas Tournade and Sangda Dorje. This introductory sequence covers the script and pronunciation, the grammar of the modern Lhasa dialect, as well as basic reading and speaking skills.  Karma Ngodup, Autumn-Winter-Spring.
 
Second Year Tibetan I-II-III
TBTN 20100-20200-20300.  PQ: First year Tibetan or comparable level of language skills.  This intermediate sequence covers second-level pronunciation and grammar of the modern Lhasa dialect, as well as intermediate-level reading and speaking skills.  Karma Ngodup, Autumn-Winter; Staff, Spring.
 
Third Year Tibetan I-II-III
TBTN 30100-30200-30300.  PQ: Second year Tibetan or comparable level of language skills.  The third- and fourth-year sequence is meant to expose students to a range of genres in Tibetan literature, including religious, historical, philosophical, scientific, and literary works. Instruction consists in guided readings, with continuing grammar review, practice in speaking, and application of philological methods.  Christian Wedemeyer, Autumn; Matthew Kapstein, Winter; Karma Ngodup, Spring.
 
Fourth Year Tibetan I-II-III
TBTN 40100-40200-40300.  PQ: Third year Tibetan or comparable level of language skills.  The third- and fourth-year sequence is meant to expose students to a range of genres in Tibetan literature, including religious, historical, philosophical, scientific, and literary works. Instruction consists in guided readings, with continuing grammar review, practice in speaking, and application of philological methods.  Christian Wedemeyer, Autumn; Matthew Kapstein, Winter; Karma Ngodup, Spring.
 
Readings: Advanced Tibetan I-II-III
TBTN 47900-47901-47902.  PQ: Fourth year Tibetan or comparable level of language skills.  Readings: Advanced Tibetan is for students who have successfully completed third year and fourth year or equivalent with placement test. The sequence is meant to expose students to a range of genres in Tibetan literature, including religious, historical, philosophical, scientific, and literary works. Instruction includes guided readings with continuing grammar review, practice in speaking, and application of philological methods.  Christian Wedemeyer, Autumn; Matthew Kapstein, Winter; Karma Ngodup, Spring.

URDU COURSES

First Year Urdu I-II-III
URDU 10100-10200-10300. Spoken by over thirty-five million people in South Asia, Urdu is the national language of Pakistan and one of the official languages of India. It is written in the Perso-Arabic script, which facilitates learning to read and write several other South Asian languages. This three-quarter sequence covers basic grammar and vocabulary. Our text is C. M. Naim’s Introductory Urdu, Volumes I and II. Students learn to read and write the Urdu script, as well as to compose/write in Urdu. By the end of three quarters students have covered all the major grammatical structures of the language. We also emphasize aural and oral skills (i.e., listening, pronunciation, speaking). These courses must be taken in sequence, since the script is introduced in the Autumn quarter. Students should also be aware that they need to contact the instructor ahead of time to discuss scheduling if they are planning to take this course.  Elena Bashir, Autumn-Winter-Spring. Prospective students should contact instructor: ebashir@uchicago.edu.
 
Second Year Urdu I-II-III
URDU 20100-20200-20300. PQ: First year Urdu or comparable level of language skills.  This sequence is a continuation of URDU 10100-10200-10300. There is increased emphasis on vocabulary building and reading progressively complex texts. Depending on ability levels and interests of the students, readings can include selections from various original sources. Elena Bashir, Autumn-Winter-Spring. Prospective students should contact instructor: ebashir@uchicago.edu.
 
Third Year Urdu I-II-III
URDU 30100-30200-30300.  PQ: Second year Urdu or comparable level of language skills.  The third- and fourth-year sequence consists of courses primarily in Urdu prose, meant for students who have already mastered the grammar and control vocabulary past the basic level. The two-year cycle includes passages/selections from noted Urdu writers from the late eighteenth through the twentieth century. The sequence has two major goals. The first goal is to emphasize training in comprehension, reading, writing, philology, and discussion (in Urdu). A second goal is to encourage analysis of the widely acknowledged masters of Urdu style by locating them within the larger context of early modern and modern South Asian social and intellectual history.  Muzaffar Alam, Autumn-Winter-Spring.
 
Fourth Year Urdu I-II-III
URDU 40100-40200-40300.  PQ: Third year Urdu or comparable level of language skills.  The third- and fourth-year sequence consists of courses primarily in Urdu prose, meant for students who have already mastered the grammar and control vocabulary past the basic level. The two-year cycle includes passages/selections from noted Urdu writers from the late eighteenth through the twentieth century. The sequence has two major goals. The first goal is to emphasize training in comprehension, reading, writing, philology, and discussion (in Urdu). A second goal is to encourage analysis of the widely acknowledged masters of Urdu style by locating them within the larger context of early modern and modern South Asian social and intellectual history.  Muzaffar Alam, Autumn-Winter-Spring.
 
Readings: Advanced Urdu I-II-III
URDU 47900-47901-47902.  PQ: Fourth year Urdu or comparable level of language skills.  This course is for students who have successfully completed third- and fourth-year Urdu. It is typically tailored to student needs in terms of the selection of texts to be addressed and discussed. Depending on their interest, students may choose to read Urdu texts from any time period, country or genre. Prior consent of instructor is required.  Muzaffar Alam, Autumn-Winter-Spring.
 
 

Previously Offered SALC Course Descriptions

Other Course Resources